Messier objects gallery. M1-M11 - 11 fotos

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iyalogoThis gallery (distributed in 10 posts) will include all Messier objects, 110, that many amateur astronomers use today as reference.

Charles Messier (1730-06-26 – 1817-04-12) was a French astronomer most notable for publishing an astronomical catalogue consisting of deep sky objects such as nebulae and star clusters that came to be known as the 103 “Messier objects”. Many of the objects in the Messier catalogue were discovered by his assistant, Pierre Mechain. The purpose of the catalogue was to help comet hunters, as he was, and to help other astronomical observers to distinguish between permanent and transient objects in the sky. Objects, M104 through M110, are accepted by many astronomers as “official” Messier objects despite they were added between 1921 and 1966.

The crater Messier on the Moon and the asteroid 7359 Messier were named in his honor.

Let’s enjoy the Messier objects in 2009, the year of astronomy.

Messier catalog:

  1. Messier objects gallery. M1-M11
  2. Messier objects gallery. M12-M22
  3. Messier objects gallery. M23-M33
  4. Messier objects gallery. M34-M44
  5. Messier objects gallery. M45-M55
  6. Messier objects gallery. M56-M66
  7. Messier objects gallery. M67-M77
  8. Messier objects gallery. M78-M88
  9. Messier objects gallery. M89-M99
  10. Messier objects gallery. M100-M110
The Crab Nebula (catalog designations M1, NGC 1952, Taurus A) is a supernova remnant and pulsar wind nebula in the constellation of Taurus. Located at a distance of about 6,500 light-years.

1 The Crab Nebula (catalog designations M1, NGC 1952, Taurus A) is a supernova remnant and pulsar wind nebula in the constellation of Taurus. Located at a distance of about 6,500 light-years. Credit: NASA/ESA #
Messier 2 or M2 (also designated NGC 7089) is a globular cluster in the constellation Aquarius, five degrees north of the star Beta Aquarii. It was discovered by Jean-Dominique Maraldi in 1746 and is one of the largest known globular clusters.

2 Messier 2 or M2 (also designated NGC 7089) is a globular cluster in the constellation Aquarius, five degrees north of the star Beta Aquarii. It was discovered by Jean-Dominique Maraldi in 1746 and is one of the largest known globular clusters. Credit: NASA/STScI/WikiSky #
Messier 3 (also known as M3 or NGC 5272) is a globular cluster in the constellation Canes Venatici. It was discovered by Charles Messier in 1764, and resolved into stars by William Herschel around 1784. This cluster is one of the largest and brightest, and is made up of around 500,000 stars. It is located at a distance of about 33,900 light-years away from Earth.

3 Messier 3 (also known as M3 or NGC 5272) is a globular cluster in the constellation Canes Venatici. It was discovered by Charles Messier in 1764, and resolved into stars by William Herschel around 1784. This cluster is one of the largest and brightest, and is made up of around 500,000 stars. It is located at a distance of about 33,900 light-years away from Earth. Credit: DJMcCrady #
Messier 4 or M4 (also designated NGC 6121) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Scorpius. It was discovered by Philippe Loys de Chéseaux in 1746 and catalogued by Charles Messier in 1764. It was the first globular cluster in which individual stars were resolved.

4 Messier 4 or M4 (also designated NGC 6121) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Scorpius. It was discovered by Philippe Loys de Chéseaux in 1746 and catalogued by Charles Messier in 1764. It was the first globular cluster in which individual stars were resolved. Credit: NASA/STScI/WikiSky #
Messier 5 or M5 (also designated NGC 5904) is a globular cluster in the constellation Serpens. It was discovered by Gottfried Kirch in 1702. It should not to be confused with the much fainter and more distant globular cluster Palomar 5, which is situated nearby in the sky.

5 Messier 5 or M5 (also designated NGC 5904) is a globular cluster in the constellation Serpens. It was discovered by Gottfried Kirch in 1702. It should not to be confused with the much fainter and more distant globular cluster Palomar 5, which is situated nearby in the sky. Credit: NASA/STScI/WikiSky #
Open star cluster M6, the Butterfly Cluster, photographed by Nigel Sharp and Mark Hanna. This image shows clearly that most brighter stars in this cluster are young blue stars but the brightest one is an orange giant (Spectral type K0-K3).

6 Open star cluster M6, the Butterfly Cluster, photographed by Nigel Sharp and Mark Hanna. This image shows clearly that most brighter stars in this cluster are young blue stars but the brightest one is an orange giant (Spectral type K0-K3). Credit: Nigel Sharp, Mark Hanna, AURA/NOAO/NSF #
M7 is an open star cluster in the constellation Scorpius, set against the dramatic backdrop of the Milky Way, stars scattered like dust. This provides an interesting contrast with its near neighbor M6. M7 was known as early as the year 130 AD, when it was mentioned by Ptolemy.

7 M7 is an open star cluster in the constellation Scorpius, set against the dramatic backdrop of the Milky Way, stars scattered like dust. This provides an interesting contrast with its near neighbor M6. M7 was known as early as the year 130 AD, when it was mentioned by Ptolemy. Credit: N.A.Sharp, REU program/AURA/NOAO/NSF #
The Lagoon Nebula (catalogued as Messier 8 or M8, and as NGC 6523) is a giant interstellar cloud in the constellation Sagittarius. It is classified as an emission nebula and as an H II region.

The Lagoon Nebula was discovered by Guillaume Le Gentil in 1747 and is one of only two star-forming nebulae faintly visible to the naked eye from mid-northern latitudes.

8 The Lagoon Nebula (catalogued as Messier 8 or M8, and as NGC 6523) is a giant interstellar cloud in the constellation Sagittarius. It is classified as an emission nebula and as an H II region. The Lagoon Nebula was discovered by Guillaume Le Gentil in 1747 and is one of only two star-forming nebulae faintly visible to the naked eye from mid-northern latitudes. Credit: Richard Crisp #
Messier 9 or M9 (also designated NGC 6333) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Ophiuchus. It was discovered by Charles Messier in 1764.

M9 is one of the nearer globular clusters to the center of the Milky Way Galaxy with a distance of around 5,500 light-years.

9 Messier 9 or M9 (also designated NGC 6333) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Ophiuchus. It was discovered by Charles Messier in 1764. M9 is one of the nearer globular clusters to the center of the Milky Way Galaxy with a distance of around 5,500 light-years. Credit: Jim Misti #
Messier 10 or M10 (also designated NGC 6254) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Ophiuchus.

The object was discovered by Charles Messier on May 29, 1764, who cataloged it as number 10 in his list. He described it as a

10 Messier 10 or M10 (also designated NGC 6254) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Ophiuchus. The object was discovered by Charles Messier on May 29, 1764, who cataloged it as number 10 in his list. He described it as a "nebula without stars", but later study revealed it as a globular cluster of thousands of stars. Credit: NASA/STScI/WikiSky #
The Wild Duck Cluster (also known as Messier 11, or NGC 6705) is an open cluster in the constellation Scutum. It was discovered by Gottfried Kirch in 1681. Charles Messier included it in his catalogue in 1764.

The Wild Duck Cluster is one of the richest and most compact of the known open clusters, containing about 2900 stars. Its age has been estimated to about 220 million years. Its name derives from the brighter stars forming a triangle which could represent a flying flock of ducks.

11 The Wild Duck Cluster (also known as Messier 11, or NGC 6705) is an open cluster in the constellation Scutum. It was discovered by Gottfried Kirch in 1681. Charles Messier included it in his catalogue in 1764. The Wild Duck Cluster is one of the richest and most compact of the known open clusters, containing about 2900 stars. Its age has been estimated to about 220 million years. Its name derives from the brighter stars forming a triangle which could represent a flying flock of ducks. Credit: Matthias Haase - Cern Astronomy Club #
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Comments (7)

  1. What happened to M12-22 they are dups of M23-33 !!!!

    Monday, July 13, 2009 at 4:30 am #
  2. admin wrote::

    You are right. Wrong linking there. Corrected.
    Thanks :)

    Monday, July 13, 2009 at 6:35 am #
  3. Dan wrote::

    Thanks for updating … totally enjoyed the large photos with info .. Always wondered what some of the less known Messier objects portrayed

    Tuesday, July 14, 2009 at 4:04 am #
  4. Beto wrote::

    Thanks brother, but… more i read, i see and i think about distances, sizes, time, ages, etc… more and more small i feel i become. Thanks milkyway… i mean, thanks anyway

    Saturday, July 31, 2010 at 5:16 am #
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    Saturday, November 20, 2010 at 3:14 pm #
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    Sunday, March 13, 2011 at 10:34 pm #
  7. wypadek przy pracy wrote::

    Ich möchte Ihnen für diese Hinweise danken. Sie sind sehr nützlich.

    Friday, December 30, 2011 at 1:47 am #

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