Earth’s moon - 19 fotos

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The Moon (Latin: Luna) is Earth’s only natural satellite and the fifth largest satellite in the Solar System. The average centre-to-centre distance from the Earth to the Moon is 384,403 km, about thirty times the diameter of the Earth. The common centre of mass of the system (the barycentre) is located about 1,700 km—a quarter the Earth’s radius—beneath the surface of the Earth. The Moon makes a complete orbit around the Earth every 27.3 days (the orbital period), and the periodic variations in the geometry of the Earth–Moon–Sun system are responsible for the lunar phases that repeat every 29.5 days (the synodic period). [wikipedia.org]

NASA is returning to the moon to build a sustainable long term human presence. The Constellation Program is building the Ares rockets and Orion crew capsule.


You can enjoy this music theme , Tranquility base, while the last mega animated gif loads.

This artist's rendering represents a concept of the Orion crew exploration vehicle docked to a lunar lander in lunar orbit.

1 This artist's rendering represents a concept of the Orion crew exploration vehicle docked to a lunar lander in lunar orbit. Credit: Lockheed Martin Corp. #
Moon landing map.

2 Moon landing map. Credit: NASA #
Astronaut Buzz Aldrin, lunar module pilot, walks on the surface of the Moon near the leg of the Lunar Module

3 Astronaut Buzz Aldrin, lunar module pilot, walks on the surface of the Moon near the leg of the Lunar Module "Eagle" during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity. Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, took this photograph. Credit: NASA #
This enhanced image of the Moon was taken with the NOAO Mosaic CCD camera using two of the National Science Foundation's telescopes located at Kitt Peak National Observatory near Tucson, AZ.

4 This enhanced image of the Moon was taken with the NOAO Mosaic CCD camera using two of the National Science Foundation's telescopes located at Kitt Peak National Observatory near Tucson, AZ. Credit: T.A.Rector, I.P.Dell'Antonio/NOAO/AURA/NSF #
The image data were combined in an exaggerated color scheme to emphasize composition differences - blue hues reveal titanium rich areas while orange and purple colors show regions relatively poor in titanium and iron.

5 The image data were combined in an exaggerated color scheme to emphasize composition differences - blue hues reveal titanium rich areas while orange and purple colors show regions relatively poor in titanium and iron. Credit: Galileo Project, JPL, NASA #
Moon.

6 Moon. Credit: NASA #
Eclipse of the Moon on 3rd March 2008, shortly before the start of totality. The red hue is due to blue light being preferentially scattered in the Earth's atmosphere by Raleigh scattering.

7 Eclipse of the Moon on 3rd March 2008, shortly before the start of totality. The red hue is due to blue light being preferentially scattered in the Earth's atmosphere by Raleigh scattering. Credit: NASA #
This full disc of the Moon was photographed by the Apollo 17 crew during their trans-Earth coast homeward following a successful lunar landing mission in December 1972. Mare seen on this photo include Serentatis, Tranquillitatis, Nectaris, Foecunditatis and Crisium.

8 This full disc of the Moon was photographed by the Apollo 17 crew during their trans-Earth coast homeward following a successful lunar landing mission in December 1972. Mare seen on this photo include Serentatis, Tranquillitatis, Nectaris, Foecunditatis and Crisium. Credit: NASA #
During its flight, the Galileo spacecraft returned images of the Moon. The Galileo spacecraft took these images on December 7, 1992 on its way to explore the Jupiter system in 1995-97. The distinct bright ray crater at the bottom of the image is the Tycho impact basin. The dark areas are lava rock filled impact basins: Oceanus Procellarum (on the left), Mare Imbrium (center left), Mare Serenitatis and Mare Tranquillitatis (center), and Mare Crisium (near the right edge). This picture contains images through the Violet, 756 nm, 968 nm filters. The color is 'enhanced' in the sense that the CCD camera is sensitive to near infrared wavelengths of light beyond human vision.

9 During its flight, the Galileo spacecraft returned images of the Moon. The Galileo spacecraft took these images on December 7, 1992 on its way to explore the Jupiter system in 1995-97. The distinct bright ray crater at the bottom of the image is the Tycho impact basin. The dark areas are lava rock filled impact basins: Oceanus Procellarum (on the left), Mare Imbrium (center left), Mare Serenitatis and Mare Tranquillitatis (center), and Mare Crisium (near the right edge). This picture contains images through the Violet, 756 nm, 968 nm filters. The color is 'enhanced' in the sense that the CCD camera is sensitive to near infrared wavelengths of light beyond human vision. Credit: NASA/JPL/USGS #
The full moon as we usually expect it.

10 The full moon as we usually expect it. Credit: NASA #
Hypersaturated moon.

11 Hypersaturated moon. Credit: & copyright: Noel Carboni #
After Apollo 12 left lunar orbit this image of the Moon was taken from the command module on 11/24/69.

12 After Apollo 12 left lunar orbit this image of the Moon was taken from the command module on 11/24/69. Credit: NASA #
Copernicus is 93 km wide and is located within the Mare Imbrium Basin, northern nearside of the Moon (10 degrees N., 20 degrees W.). Image shows crater floor, floor mounds, rim, and rayed ejecta. Rays from the ejecta are superposed on all other surrounding terrains which places the crater in its namesake age group: the Copernican system, established as the youngest assemblage of rocks on the Moon (Shoemaker and Hackman, 1962, The Moon: London, Academic Press, p.289- 300).

13 Copernicus is 93 km wide and is located within the Mare Imbrium Basin, northern nearside of the Moon (10 degrees N., 20 degrees W.). Image shows crater floor, floor mounds, rim, and rayed ejecta. Rays from the ejecta are superposed on all other surrounding terrains which places the crater in its namesake age group: the Copernican system, established as the youngest assemblage of rocks on the Moon (Shoemaker and Hackman, 1962, The Moon: London, Academic Press, p.289- 300). Credit: NASA/JPL/USGS #
In December of 1972, Apollo 17 astronauts Eugene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt spent about 75 hours on the Moon in the Taurus-Littrow valley, while colleague Ronald Evans orbited overhead. This sharp panorama is digitally stitched together from pictures taken by Cernan as he and Schmitt roamed the valley floor. Starting with a view of the imposing South Massif, scrolling the panorama to the right will reveal Schmitt and the lunar rover at the edge of Shorty Crater, near the spot where geologist Schmitt discovered orange lunar soil. The Apollo 17 crew returned with 110 kilograms of rock and soil samples, more than was returned from any of the other lunar landing sites. Now thirty five years later, Cernan and Schmitt are still the last to walk on the Moon.

14 In December of 1972, Apollo 17 astronauts Eugene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt spent about 75 hours on the Moon in the Taurus-Littrow valley, while colleague Ronald Evans orbited overhead. This sharp panorama is digitally stitched together from pictures taken by Cernan as he and Schmitt roamed the valley floor. Starting with a view of the imposing South Massif, scrolling the panorama to the right will reveal Schmitt and the lunar rover at the edge of Shorty Crater, near the spot where geologist Schmitt discovered orange lunar soil. The Apollo 17 crew returned with 110 kilograms of rock and soil samples, more than was returned from any of the other lunar landing sites. Now thirty five years later, Cernan and Schmitt are still the last to walk on the Moon. Credit: Apollo 17 Crew, NASA; Panorama Assembly: Mike Constantine #
Near the beginning of their third and final excursion across the lunar surface, Schmitt took this picture of Cernan flanked by an American flag and their lunar rover's umbrella-shaped high-gain antenna. The prominent Sculptured Hills lie in the background while Schmitt's reflection can just be made out in Cernan's helmet. The Apollo 17 crew returned with 110 kilograms of rock and soil samples, more than from any of the other lunar landing sites.

15 Near the beginning of their third and final excursion across the lunar surface, Schmitt took this picture of Cernan flanked by an American flag and their lunar rover's umbrella-shaped high-gain antenna. The prominent Sculptured Hills lie in the background while Schmitt's reflection can just be made out in Cernan's helmet. The Apollo 17 crew returned with 110 kilograms of rock and soil samples, more than from any of the other lunar landing sites. Credit: Apollo 17, NASA (Image scanned by Kipp Teague) #
Earthrise - Apollo 8. This view of the rising Earth greeted the Apollo 8 astronauts as they came from behind the Moon after the lunar orbit insertion burn. Earth is about five degrees above the horizon in the photo. The unnamed surface features in the foreground are near the eastern limb of the Moon as viewed from Earth. The lunar horizon is approximately 780 kilometers from the spacecraft. Width of the photographed area at the horizon is about 175 kilometers. On the Earth 240,000 miles away, the sunset terminator bisects Africa.

16 Earthrise - Apollo 8. This view of the rising Earth greeted the Apollo 8 astronauts as they came from behind the Moon after the lunar orbit insertion burn. Earth is about five degrees above the horizon in the photo. The unnamed surface features in the foreground are near the eastern limb of the Moon as viewed from Earth. The lunar horizon is approximately 780 kilometers from the spacecraft. Width of the photographed area at the horizon is about 175 kilometers. On the Earth 240,000 miles away, the sunset terminator bisects Africa. Credit: NASA #
The topography of the Moon referenced to the lunar geoid. The topogographic model is derived from the spherical harmonic model USGS359, and the lunar geoid was obtained from the gravity model LP150Q. The color coded topography is overlain on a shaded relief map.

17 The topography of the Moon referenced to the lunar geoid. The topogographic model is derived from the spherical harmonic model USGS359, and the lunar geoid was obtained from the gravity model LP150Q. The color coded topography is overlain on a shaded relief map. Credit: Mark A. Wieczorek #
The tried-and-true conical form is the safest and most reliable for re-entering the Earth's atmosphere, especially when returning directly from the moon. This artist's rendering represents a concept of the Orion crew exploration vehicle docked to a lunar lander in lunar orbit.

18 The tried-and-true conical form is the safest and most reliable for re-entering the Earth's atmosphere, especially when returning directly from the moon. This artist's rendering represents a concept of the Orion crew exploration vehicle docked to a lunar lander in lunar orbit. Credit: Lockheed Martin Corp. #
Simulated views of the Moon over one month, demonstrating librations in latitude and longitude.

19 Simulated views of the Moon over one month, demonstrating librations in latitude and longitude. Credit: Tomruen #
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Comments (18)

  1. admin wrote::

    I have found this place for those that have enjoyed this post.

    http://lpod.wikispaces.com/

    Has anyone played the music of this post?

    Thursday, April 2, 2009 at 1:12 am #
  2. joe wrote::

    i am a teacher and i found this really help with my class…wonderful it was really good…thank so much

    Monday, May 11, 2009 at 11:00 pm #
  3. Henry Lawson wrote::

    Phenomenal photos – thanks.
    I particularly like number 19 – the animation of the moon.

    Friday, October 16, 2009 at 9:16 am #
  4. rggh wrote::

    kjljkl

    Friday, November 20, 2009 at 4:15 pm #
  5. Car People wrote::

    Thanks for posting so many cool photos on one page. Normally I have to trawl lots of pages to find so many great pics.

    I’ve bookmarked this and am sending the link to several friends.

    Sunday, March 21, 2010 at 3:27 pm #
  6. Paulo wrote::

    Nice! another point of view!

    Saturday, October 9, 2010 at 4:55 pm #
  7. moon wrote::

    ye sub jhoot hai ye log chand pe gaye hi nahi hain

    Monday, October 18, 2010 at 5:45 pm #
  8. woody wrote::

    good

    Saturday, November 20, 2010 at 9:04 pm #
  9. woody wrote::

    the moon is looks good

    Saturday, November 20, 2010 at 9:06 pm #
  10. woody wrote::

    cools on it

    Saturday, November 20, 2010 at 9:06 pm #
  11. woody wrote::

    the moon was her for ages

    Saturday, November 20, 2010 at 9:15 pm #
  12. woody wrote::

    the first men on moon

    Saturday, November 20, 2010 at 9:21 pm #
  13. woody wrote::

    it moves

    Saturday, November 20, 2010 at 9:26 pm #
  14. shalu wrote::

    all the photos are fabulous i like the 19th animation very much its wonderful

    Monday, January 31, 2011 at 5:45 pm #
  15. hatice wrote::

    thank you so much ! best wishes from Turkiye

    Monday, March 14, 2011 at 8:17 pm #
  16. Eva wrote::

    I am impressed with the Photos and the animation of the Moon. On Feb. 19th 2011 I took photos of the Moon it looked especially amazing that night my Pics. look exactly like the ones I just viewed.I have taken pics before but never before in so much detail I have a Nikon CoolPiz100 w/26x Optical Zoom.

    Sunday, March 20, 2011 at 12:35 am #
  17. kurtabus wrote::

    I found this page made me sad for what could of been.

    Thursday, March 24, 2011 at 6:18 pm #
  18. Oscar Peláez wrote::

    Muchas gracias imágenes impresionantes. sencillamente formidables.

    Friday, January 13, 2012 at 10:52 pm #

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