Bonsai - 42 fotos

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Bonsai common styles

  • The formal upright style, or Chokkan, is characterized by a straight, upright, tapering trunk. Branches progress regularly from the thickest and broadest at the bottom to the finest and shortest at the top.
  • The trunk and branches of the informal upright style, or Moyogi incorporate visible curves, but the apex of the informal upright is always located directly above the trunk’s entry into the soil line. Similar to the formal upright style, branches generally progress regularly from largest at the bottom to smallest at the top, although this progression may be broken where the irregular shape of the trunk would make a branch abnormally prominent or obscure.
  • Slant-style, or Shakan, bonsai possess straight trunks like those of bonsai grown in the formal upright style. However, the slant style trunk emerges from the soil at an angle, and the apex of the bonsai will be located to the left or right of the root base.
  • Cascade-style, or Kengai, bonsai are modeled after trees which grow over water or on the sides of mountains. The apex, or tip of the tree in the Semi-cascade-style, or Han Kengai, bonsai extend just at or beneath the lip of the bonsai pot; the apex of a (full) cascade style falls below the base of the pot.
  • Raft-style, or Netsuranari, bonsai mimic a natural phenomenon that occurs when a tree topples onto its side (typically due to erosion or another natural force). Branches along the top side of the trunk continue to grow as a group of new trunks. Sometimes, roots will develop from buried portions of the trunk. Raft-style bonsai can have sinuous, straight-line, or slanting trunks, all giving the illusion that they are a group of separate trees—while actually being the branches of a tree planted on its side.
  • The literati style, or Bunjin-gi, bonsai is characterized by a generally bare trunk line, with branches reduced to a minimum, and typically placed higher up on a long, often contorted trunk. This style derives its name from the Chineseliterati, who were often artists. Some painted Chinese brush paintings, like those found in the ancient text,The Mustard Seed Garden Manual of Painting, depicting pine trees that grew in harsh climates, struggling to reach sunlight. In Japan, the literati style is known as bunjin-gi (文人木). (Bunjin is a translation of the Chinese phrasewenren meaning “scholars practiced in the arts” and gi is a derivative of the Japanese word, ki, for “tree”).
  • The group or forest style, or Yose Ue, comprises a planting of more than one tree (typically an odd number if there are three or more trees, and essentially never 4 because of its significance in China) in a bonsai pot. The trees are usually the same species, with a variety of heights employed to add visual interest and to reflect the age differences encountered in mature forests.
  • The root-over-rock style, or Sekijoju, is a style in which the roots of a tree (typically a fig tree) are wrapped around a rock. The rock is at the base of the trunk, with the roots exposed to varying degrees.
  • The broom style, or Hokidachi is employed for trees with extensive, fine branching, often with species like elms. The trunk is straight and upright. It branches out in all directions about 1/3 of the way up the entire height of the tree. The branches and leaves form a ball-shaped crown which can also be very beautiful during the winter months.
  • The multi-trunk style, or Ikadabuki has all the trunks growing out of one root system, and it actually is one single tree. All the trunks form one crown of leaves, in which the thickest and most developed trunk forms the top.
  • The growing-in-a-rock, or Ishizuke style means the roots of the tree are growing in the cracks and holes of the rock. There is not much room for the roots to develop and take up nutrients. These trees are designed to visually represent that the tree has to struggle to survive.

Besides taking care of these trees I have found a nice short guide to help  with bonsai photography because your great bonsais can look much better without much effort.

The bonsai experience.

1 The bonsai experience. Credit: bluinfaccia #
Chinzan Azalea Bonsai.

2 Chinzan Azalea Bonsai. Credit: LouisL #
What specie is this??

3 What specie is this?? Credit: xeal #
American Barberry Bonsai.

4 American Barberry Bonsai. Credit: LouisL #
Procumbens Juniper Bonsai.

5 Procumbens Juniper Bonsai. Credit: LouisL #
Upright Literati Juniper Bonsai, Washington, DC.

6 Upright Literati Juniper Bonsai, Washington, DC. Credit: Grufnik #
Scots Pine.

7 Scots Pine. Credit: leahish #
A Chinese Juniper (Juniperus chinensis) trained in the Han-kengai or semi-cascade style.

8 A Chinese Juniper (Juniperus chinensis) trained in the Han-kengai or semi-cascade style. Credit: Grufnik #
Slanted Bonsai.

9 Slanted Bonsai. Credit: ctankcycles #
Willowleaf Fig (Ficus neriifolia). In training since 1974 .

10 Willowleaf Fig (Ficus neriifolia). In training since 1974 . Credit: cliff1066 #
A Tiger Bark Ficus (Ficus retusa) bonsai. From the Collection of the National Bonsai and Penjing Mueseum at The United States National Arboretum.

11 A Tiger Bark Ficus (Ficus retusa) bonsai. From the Collection of the National Bonsai and Penjing Mueseum at The United States National Arboretum. Credit: Grufnik #
An old Azalea, probably a Satsuki type, Chozan cultivar based on the color and texture of the bark, done in the root over rock style.

12 An old Azalea, probably a Satsuki type, Chozan cultivar based on the color and texture of the bark, done in the root over rock style. Credit: Grufnik #
bonsai (ume)

13 bonsai (ume) Credit: sama sama - massa #
A very old Satsuki Azalea grown from a whip shoot.

14 A very old Satsuki Azalea grown from a whip shoot. Credit: Grufnik #
Bonsai Azalea.

15 Bonsai Azalea. Credit: Cowtools #
Scarlet Begonias in Bonsai.

16 Scarlet Begonias in Bonsai. Credit: the monk #
Azalea Bonsai.

17 Azalea Bonsai. Credit: Cowtools #
Japanese Maple (Acer palmatum). Informal upright style.

18 Japanese Maple (Acer palmatum). Informal upright style. Credit: celie #
Halloween bonsai.

19 Halloween bonsai. Credit: the monk #
Chinese Elm.

20 Chinese Elm. Credit: Cowtools #
Japanese Acer Bonsai Tree, the origin of this specimen is 1955.

21 Japanese Acer Bonsai Tree, the origin of this specimen is 1955. Credit: Ennor #
Pomegranate.

22 Pomegranate. Credit: andrew k #
Bonsai with fall foliage.

23 Bonsai with fall foliage. Credit: oh_candy #
Maple about to turn.

24 Maple about to turn. Credit: the monk #
A bonsai over the blue sky.

25 A bonsai over the blue sky. Credit: nojhan #
Azalea Bonsai.

26 Azalea Bonsai. Credit: Gafoto #
Ficus N sumo Jim Smith.

27 Ficus N sumo Jim Smith. Credit: OpenEye #
Sumo Ficus nerifolia.

28 Sumo Ficus nerifolia. Credit: OpenEye #
Korean Hornbeam display.

29 Korean Hornbeam display. Credit: OpenEye #
Weeping bonsai.

30 Weeping bonsai. Credit: inajeep #
Best of British Bonsai Exhibition 2009.

31 Best of British Bonsai Exhibition 2009. Credit: 1967geezer #
Ezo Spruce (Picea glehnii). In training since 1925.

32 Ezo Spruce (Picea glehnii). In training since 1925. Credit: cliff1066 #
Bonsai Garden.

33 Bonsai Garden. Credit: Anosmia #
Scots MidAtlantic 2008.

34 Scots MidAtlantic 2008. Credit: OpenEye #
Chinese Elm (Ulmus parvifolia) Clinging to Kam Kong Stone. In training since 1951 .

35 Chinese Elm (Ulmus parvifolia) Clinging to Kam Kong Stone. In training since 1951 . Credit: cliff1066 #
Root-over-rock style maple on display at the Chinese Penjing Collection of National Bonsai and Penjing Museum in Washington, DC.

36 Root-over-rock style maple on display at the Chinese Penjing Collection of National Bonsai and Penjing Museum in Washington, DC. Credit: USDA photo by Peggy Greb #
Ficus nerifolia & friend.

37 Ficus nerifolia & friend. Credit: Vinicius Costa #
Hobbiton bonsai trayscape.

38 Hobbiton bonsai trayscape. Credit: 1967geezer #
Chinese Elm (Ulmus parvifolia)

39 Chinese Elm (Ulmus parvifolia) Credit: cliff1066 #
Japanese Boxthorn (Serissa japonica)

40 Japanese Boxthorn (Serissa japonica) Credit: cliff1066 #
John Naka's famous Goshin.

41 John Naka's famous Goshin. Credit: ragesoss #
A Bald Cypress (Taxodium distichum) forest bonsai on display at the National Bonsai and Penjing Museum at the United States National Arboretum.It has been in training since 1988.

42 A Bald Cypress (Taxodium distichum) forest bonsai on display at the National Bonsai and Penjing Museum at the United States National Arboretum.It has been in training since 1988. Credit: Ragesoss #
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Comments (8)

  1. Les felicito por esta preciosa pagina, es un placer ver las maravillosoas fotografias aqui presentes. Gracias.

    Monday, May 10, 2010 at 10:51 pm #
  2. Nugi wrote::

    Nice Blog and Nice Info, Thanks a Lot of
    Beautiful bonsai,,

    Wednesday, June 30, 2010 at 4:22 pm #
  3. om gatot wrote::

    wonderful world

    Thursday, September 23, 2010 at 5:29 am #
  4. Jasminka wrote::

    BRAVO!!!

    Friday, February 18, 2011 at 1:57 pm #
  5. ronie morala wrote::

    i am a flora lover and i just got interest on bonsai stuff and art i love your displays on the net i am starting creating my artwork few months ago i love my recent works of art

    Friday, June 10, 2011 at 2:06 pm #
  6. Matilde wrote::

    Lovely page. Thanks!

    Sunday, July 10, 2011 at 11:35 pm #
  7. John Michael wrote::

    Hey I hade a few questions. What is the little hobbit hut made of and how did you make the fence. Thank you

    Sunday, November 20, 2011 at 5:32 pm #
  8. Matt wrote::

    The third one is a Chrysanthemum & is absolutely stunning, the level of skill needed to create such a successful piece is a credit to the artist.

    Thursday, January 26, 2012 at 3:30 am #

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